Windows Key Killer

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Windows Key Killer

PostPosted by JH2k » Thu Feb 05, 2009 1:43 am

Sorry, I was in doubt about what sub-forum would be the correct. Move if necessary.

As you I suffered the Windows Key, but today, playing "Fifa 2000", I said... NO MORE.

I was playing a match, almost at the end, 20min of match, accidentally pressed the Windows key and... game corrupted, wasted time :-( and it's not the first time, nor the first game.

So I searched and I found this utility that works perfectly. Disables the Windows Key, but not the Windows Key combinations (Win+F, Win+D, you know). Ideal for players as us.

Winkey killer
http://www.majorgeeks.com/download304.html
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Re: Windows Key Killer

PostPosted by OldCigarette » Tue Feb 17, 2009 5:15 am

Another good windows utility I recently found for games is DXWnd, lets you play directx games in a windowed mode even if not supported!
http://files.filefront.com/DXWND+MS/;53 ... einfo.html
Very useful for debugging purposes :)
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Re: Windows Key Killer

PostPosted by justjohnny » Tue May 18, 2010 8:56 am

OldCigarette wrote:Another good windows utility I recently found for games is DXWnd, lets you play directx games in a windowed mode even if not supported!
http://files.filefront.com/DXWND+MS/;53 ... einfo.html
Very useful for debugging purposes :)


Found another useful tool:
http://www.majorgeeks.com/GLDirect_d381.html
Enables OpenGL apps to use Direct3D drivers . Now Freeware.

From SciTech:

"The SciTech GLDirect product has been discontinued. If you would like to continue to use the latest 5.0.2 release on
your computer, please use the following free registration code to unlock the product:

Name: Free Code
Code: 1C10-0485-A489-E2
"

Run games and CAD applications based on the OpenGL® API using Microsoft DirectX 6.x or later drivers. SciTech GLDirect is compatible with any graphics card that supports DirectX 6.x and later.

SciTech GLDirect 4.0 features significant performance improvements, and has improved compatibility with applications that require the latest OpenGL extensions. It is based on Mesa 5, which supports the OpenGL 1.4 graphics standard.

The CAD and Game drivers in previous versions of SciTech GLDirect have been replaced with drivers optimized for DirectX 7, DirectX 8, and DirectX 9. The one that works best for you will depend on the capabilities of your graphics driver.
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Re: Windows Key Killer

PostPosted by JH2k » Tue May 18, 2010 1:47 pm

Under Windows 2000 will be ever better to use OpenGL. Even if this is just my personal opinion because I have nothing to proof it, but my experience, I find better. I always find better performance with OpenGL

So, why wrap OpenGL to Directx? ;)
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Re: Windows Key Killer

PostPosted by justjohnny » Fri May 21, 2010 3:44 am

JH2k wrote:Under Windows 2000 will be ever better to use OpenGL. Even if this is just my personal opinion because I have nothing to proof it, but my experience, I find better. I always find better performance with OpenGL

So, why wrap OpenGL to Directx? ;)

I'm not sure about performance, but I've always preferred the look of OpenGL over DirectX.

Perhaps it might be easier to debug in DirectX than OpenGL.

Perhaps someone wants to run it in a windowed mode(wrap OpenGL to DirectX and then use DXWnd to run it in windowed mode).

Perhaps others out there prefer the look of DirectX over OpenGL:
http://gregs-blog.com/2008/01/16/whats- ... filtering/
Whats the Difference Between Bilinear and Trilinear Filtering?
Posted by gregd1024 on January 16, 2008

Im not sure how many gamers, who arent 3D programmers, know what bilinear filtering means; however, I see it in the options of many games. It can be summarized by textures looking blurry up close and eliminating the blocky pixel effect which was so common back in the day of pure software-rendered 3D graphics engines. See one of my previous posts entitled, How to Turn Off Bilinear Filtering in OpenGL for a few screenshots.

In this post Ill be explaining what trilinear filtering means and how it differs from bilinear. We see an option for trilinear filtering in virtually every game on the market today (although some call it by a different name), and depending on your 3D hardware, it may even be turned on by default. However, most gamers dont know what trilinear filtering really is (unless theyre graphics programmers) or how it affects the visual characteristics of a game.

In a nutshell, just like bilinear filtering attempts to smooth out blocky pixels via interpolating between one texel and its surrounding four neighbors, trilinear filtering attempts to smooth out mipmapping gradients that are most commonly noticed when the camera is at a narrow angle relative to a wall (or any surface where the texture is very oblique to the point of view). Now, Id really like to provide a screenshot of what this gradient looks like, but with the high resolution used in todays games the effect becomes hard to see in a still screenshot. However, the effect is very noticeable when the camera is moving forward or backward.

The effect manifests itself by a sharp break between blurriness levels as a polygon recedes into the distance. At first, the polygons texture looks normal (the part closest to the camera). Then as you trace along the polygons surface all of sudden the texture loses half its resolution. If you continue tracing, you notice another break where again the resolution is cut in half. In most games this pattern is noticeable about four or five times before the polygon becomes too small to notice.

Trilinear filtering attempts to eliminate this sharp break by dynamically interpolating between different mipmap resolutions at every pixel. For example, instead of choosing between a mipmap resolution 1:1 or 1:2, it dynamically calculates a smooth gradient of mipmap levels between 1:1 and 1:2.

In the end trilinear filtering does a very good job eliminating abrupt changes in texture resolution. In some cases it is hard to tell mipmapping is even being used.

Sometime later in the week or next week, Im going to cover something known as anisotropic filtering which is meant to be a step better than trilinear filtering.

If you want to be updated on new posts automatically you can subscribe via RSS here, or if you prefer email updates click here.

-Greg Dolley


http://gregs-blog.com/2008/01/14/how-to ... in-opengl/
How to Turn Off Bilinear Filtering in OpenGL
Posted by gregd1024 on January 14, 2008

I dont know which video game popularized bilinear filtering (or trilinear filtering for that matter) for close-up objects but I personally hate the effect. The only time I can accept the look of filtering textures in this manner is if the textures resolution is massively high (so I dont see the blur). Note: for this post when I say bilinear filtering Im also referring to trilinear filtering both have the same blurring effects.

Let me show you what I mean and then Ill explain how to turn it off. The effects of bilinear filtering are best seen on textures that contain straight lines. Therefore, I put a simple checkerboard-like texture on a wall and moved the camera close to it:
Image


Notice how the edges of the alternating dark-green / light-green squares are clear and crisp. Now, lets look at the exact same thing but with bilinear filtering turned on:
Image


The edges are not clear and crisp anymore. The whole texture looks a bit blurry. If we move closer to the wall, it gets even worse:
Image


The screenshot above looks much worse in its original size; click on the picture to enlarge. Now if we didnt use bilinear filtering it would look like this:
Image


Hence the reason why I dont like bilinear filtering. It just makes things too blurry. However, I have yet to see any game programming tutorial or OpenGL tutorial explain how to turn it off.

Actually its very simple to turn off. After loading a texture you need to make the following two function calls:

glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_NEAREST);

glTexParameteri(GL_TEXTURE_2D, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_NEAREST);


Most code examples already have these calls except the values for parameter three are different. The value for that parameter depends on parameter two. Here are possible combinations:

When the second parameter is GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, parameter three can be:
GL_NEAREST_MIPMAP_NEAREST
GL_LINEAR_MIPMAP_NEAREST
GL_NEAREST_MIPMAP_LINEAR
GL_LINEAR_MIPMAP_LINEAR
GL_NEAREST
GL_LINEAR
When the second parameter is GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, parameter three can be:
GL_LINEAR
GL_NEAREST
I dont want to stray off topic and explain each parameter combination, but dont worry, Ill write another post on that topic soon. For now, just know that most examples use GL_LINEAR_MIPMAP_NEAREST for min filter and GL_LINEAR for mag filter. This combination sets up typical bilinear filtering used in most games. Trilinear filtering is almost the same except GL_LINEAR_MIPMAP_LINEAR is used instead of GL_LINEAR_MIPMAP_NEAREST.

When you set both parameters to GL_NEAREST it tells OpenGL to not interpolate any of the texel color values. It takes the calculated (u, v) coordinates, finds the texel nearest to that point in the source bitmap, and uses that color. So essentially it is just like old software rendering engines before everybody started using bilinear filtering.

-Greg Dolley
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